Biotech catalysts for 2016

After last week’s pessimistic post, this week I am focusing on potential catalysts in 2016 that could improve sentiment towards biotech as a sector.

As if to remind us late stage trials don’t always fail, last week saw positive news from three different programs, all of which are antibodies in non-oncology indications. Regeneron (REGN) and its partner Sanofi (SNY) announced excellent data in atopic dermatitis, Alder (ALDR) reported positive results in a P2b in migraine and Pfizer (PFE) had positive P3 data for its PCSK9 program.

Below are four additional clinical data readouts that (if positive) may serve as important catalysts. Continue reading

Are biotech valuations sustainable?

The biotech sector is currently in the most successful period in its history based on valuation metrics, amount of money raised and number of IPOs. The perception around the current situation ranges from very bearish (it’s a bubble) to very bullish (there’s enough innovation to fuel future growth).

Before providing my take (which is very subjective and is as good as anybody else’s for that matter), there are two things most investors agree on:

1 – The biopharma industry enjoyed a massive wave of innovation in the form of revolutionary drugs that truly make a difference for patients. These include PD-1 antibodies, curative HCV drugs and PCSK9 antibodies just to name a few. Fundamentally, our understanding around diseases and our abilities to modulate them has never been better, which should dramatically increase success rates in the long run.

2 – The biotech sector has had a huge run in the past ~3 years. Since the beginning of 2012, the primary biotech indices on NASDAQ and NYSE are up 250%-260%. This means that in 3.5 years, the biotech industry (which was already quite established at the time) saw its valuation more than triple.  Continue reading

Avalanche Biotech – approaching the moment of truth

In a field characterized by binary “make or break” events, Avalanche Biotechnologies (AAVL) is a poster child. The company derives the majority of its valuation ($819M) from AVA-101, a gene therapy treatment for wet AMD (age-related macular degeneration) currently in phase 2. Top line results are expected within 1-2 months and should have a dramatic impact on the stock as well as the entire ophthalmology industry. Continue reading

Will 2015 mark the turnaround for antibody-drug conjugates?

Back in 2010, ADCs were the hottest theme in oncology with the potential to revolutionize cancer treatment. The excitement was based on promising results for Adcetris (Seattle Genetics [SGEN]) and Kadcyla (Immunogen [IMGN]), both of which utilized new and improved ADC technologies. Adcteris and Kadcyla were perceived as the ultimate cancer drugs: They had strong single agent activity and provided meaningful benefit to patients with limited toxicity. All that was left to do was replicating their success with additional antibodies to cover every tumor type. Continue reading